Timing cover seal

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Joe
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Timing cover seal

#1 Post by Joe » Mon Sep 06, 2021 9:56 am

Hello, my timing cover seal is leaking a bit and will change it at some point. What I am not sure about is the best way to remove the crank pully nut (usually very tight). Especially how to keep engine from turning when trying to remove. Assume I have a limited workshop and no rattle gun. Thanks Joe

johnnydog
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Re: Timing cover seal

#2 Post by johnnydog » Mon Sep 06, 2021 1:32 pm

The simplest way with limited tools is to remove the starter motor, place a big flat bladed screwdriver or thin tyre lever in the teeth and against the bell housing to 'lock' it in place. It needs another pair of hands to hold the screwdriver / tyre lever whilst releasing the crankshaft nut. You may be pleasantly surprised - they aren't as tight as you think.
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Joe
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Re: Timing cover seal

#3 Post by Joe » Wed Sep 08, 2021 10:12 am

Thanks Johnnydog sounds a reasonable idea, couple more questions, is it a clockwise or counter clockwise thread. Would also like to buy a 6 face socket what size would it be?
Thanks

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Re: Timing cover seal

#4 Post by johnnydog » Wed Sep 08, 2021 12:50 pm

It is a standard right hand thread, and a 15/16 " socket is required.
Alternatively, if the engine is still in the car and up and running, you could do it the old fashioned way, by putting a socket and long extension on the crankshaft bolt, and then flick the starter. I would leave an inch or so of free movement but wrap the extension with cloths and use the chassis rail as a 'stop' to take the torque.
Like I said, the bolt won't be as tight as you would expect, and should undo relatively easily.
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1967 Mk1 2000 in Gunmetal Grey
1969 Mk1 2000 in Royal Blue
1970 Mk2 2000 in Valencia Blue
1972 Mk2 2.5 PI in Triumph White
1973 Mk2 2.5 PI in Sienna Brown
1976 Mk2 2500S in Carmine Red

Mike Stevens
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Re: Timing cover seal

#5 Post by Mike Stevens » Thu Sep 09, 2021 8:48 am

An alternative is to put a 'good' spanner on the bolt head and hit the spanner with a hammer (in the undo direction!). I have used this method on a number of times when there was no other way of locking the crankshaft. It's always worked - eventually! It may take quite a few blows with the hammer.

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