The crank end-float is the only inherent weakness of this engine

Engine Oily Bits, Ignition, Fuelling, Cooling, Exhaust, etc.
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Ltriumph
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The crank end-float is the only inherent weakness of this engine

#1 Post by Ltriumph » Fri Jun 10, 2022 12:03 am

Hi - I recently read 'The crank end-float is the only inherent weakness of this engine – catch it early and the thrusts can be replaced in situ, but bad cases can wreck both the block and crankshaft.' is this something that I should do?

I have a 1978 2000TC, about 160km, compressions down a bit but goes well.
Triumph TC 2000 1978
Triumph Bonneville T120 2018

johnnydog
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Re: The crank end-float is the only inherent weakness of this engine

#2 Post by johnnydog » Fri Jun 10, 2022 1:16 pm

You can easily gauge how much end float you have, especially on a manual. Get an assistant to depress the clutch pedal, and watch how much movement there is on the crankshaft pulley. Or simple get hold of the fan blades, and pull the crankshaft pulley forwards, and check the fore and aft movement. Apparantly the Register Service Notes state allowable end float on the 2000 engine is 0.006"-0.0014", and the 2500 is 0.0006"-0.0008", with thrust washers available in various sizes relative to the reduction required. The opinion is that the 2500 engines seem more prone to dropping their thrust washers than the 2000, but upto 0.014" in a 2500 engine shouldn't be a cause for concern.
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1967 Mk1 2000 in Gunmetal Grey
1969 Mk1 2000 in Royal Blue
1970 Mk2 2000 in Valencia Blue
1972 Mk2 2.5 PI in Triumph White
1973 Mk2 2.5 PI in Sienna Brown
1976 Mk2 2500S in Carmine Red

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