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Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:12 pm
by Tinsmith_Skippy
I’ve looked at the wiring diagrams for the 2 cars and the looms are different. I say different but they are achieving the same goal. It seems the pi connections on the tachometer has 2 (W and WS) and they go to the ballast. In the S it has a separate wire White/Slate on the coil for the tachometer and this is why it looks different to have the extra wire. However Im not ruling it out, I might have wire blindness.

Good job on the fix!

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 5:43 am
by Llessur
Makes sense to me :) At the end of the day it starts and the tacho works so I'm happy :D

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 12:47 pm
by Mike Stevens
Early and late tachos also work differently. Earlier ones are current driven and have two wires (current in and out). Later ones are voltage driven and have just the one wire from the coil/distributor connection.

If you remove the dash (or even just the tacho) on an early car, the engine won't run as there is no current out from the tacho! You can just connect the 2 wires together though. That works...

Cheers,
Mike.

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 2:54 pm
by Tinsmith_Skippy
Mike Stevens wrote:
Sun Dec 23, 2018 12:47 pm
Early and late tachos also work differently. Earlier ones are current driven and have two wires (current in and out). Later ones are voltage driven and have just the one wire from the coil/distributor connection.

If you remove the dash (or even just the tacho) on an early car, the engine won't run as there is no current out from the tacho! You can just connect the 2 wires together though. That works...

Cheers,
Mike.
A good move by triumph to change this would be annoying that you can’t start your car due to failed tachometer or a cable break. Thanks for that info mike!

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 12:32 pm
by Llessur
A couple more updates on the 2500S blog for anyone that's interested :)

https://triumph2500blog.wordpress.com/

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 11:28 am
by Llessur

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 7:52 pm
by wild bill
Lessur,
great explanation in a plain,understandable language, in easily followed steps.Well done!

P.S. congratulations on fixing the dunny,I bet the bucket was pretty full and rancid :lol: :lol:
Regards,
Bill.

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Wed Oct 23, 2019 4:57 am
by Llessur
Another update on the 2500S Project for those who love gearboxes :) https://triumph2500blog.wordpress.com/

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Wed Oct 23, 2019 3:47 pm
by Charles H
Great write up!! Still would have done the both out underneath method however. A piece of rope holding the suspension arms to each other means the shell is still moveable!
Looking forward to the next instalment!

Re: 2500 S Project

Posted: Wed Oct 23, 2019 7:19 pm
by johnnydog
Another enjoyable read!
Regarding the engine and gearbox removal, every one has their preferred method. I personally prefer to remove the gearbox from below, and then the engine from above.
One point I find makes life easier when removing the gearbox is to raise the rear wheels higher than the front wheels, so that when the rear cross member is removed and the engine is allowed drop at the back end to rest against the bulkhead, the gearbox is still in a horizontal plane. This obviously easier if using a pit or a ramp, but is still possible if doing it your back, but needs the space at the front of the car to actually do the job! The obvious securing of the vehicle at this height off the floor is important if using the floor rather than a pit or ramp, but it is still possible. This allows the transmission jack (whether that be one on a trolley jack if working on the floor, or a vertical transmission jack if using a pit or a ramp) to be drawn backwards without risking damage to the input shaft. On reassembly, once the gearbox has been raised to the correct height, it can be moved forwards on the jack and mated to the engine with ease. Having the engine tilted backwards just makes the job of mating the two harder, and the height has to be altered continuously when moving the jack / gearbox towards the engine.
Works well for me, especially if doing it singlehandedly.
I also put a piece of heavy duty foam between the back of the cylinder head and the bulkhead, so it protects the insulation and the brake pipes from damage.