Buying versus restoring

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JonnyB
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Buying versus restoring

#1 Post by JonnyB » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:12 am

Looking for a 2.5s in top condition but wonder what would be best route to take and would welcome your thoughts
The dilemma is whether to wait and pay top money for one or buy a good base car then get it restored. Cars with low miles in best condition seem to be attracting £10 k upwards from dealers. I know it would be down to the condition of a good base car but roughly what would a full restoration cost? I don't have the skills to do this myself unfortunately
Look forward to hearing your thoughts

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SimonO
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#2 Post by SimonO » Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:53 am

Depends what you want the car to be (in my opinion!)

I wanted a custom fast road car to my own specification and I bought a car that was too far gone (although it had a fresh MOT). About £4-5k on metalwork and another £8k on modifications so far before I have even got to paint. The car is not worth anything like the money I have put into it, but at the end of the day it will be my car to my design - and I saved one from being scrapped. I couldn't have found one already modified the way I wanted and I didn't want to "ruin" a good car.

If I wanted an original car to show - I would just buy one already done. Taking care that the floors, sills and arches were good. The mechanical bits seem easy to sort. The costs of restoration will always be 2 to 3 times what you think they'll be.

£10k seems steep for anything that isn't Mk1 PI. About £6-7k still gets a very, very nice car if you hunt about and £4-5k gets you something on the road that looks good and is usable with some TLC.

I'd always buy the best I could rather than buy one to restore. Also, I'd avoid a certain dealers near Leicester that seem to be asking top dollar for average cars.

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Dave B
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#3 Post by Dave B » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:46 pm

As Simon says, its better to spend more on an original car than on a car that needs work. Welding & painting are very labour intensive and can turn out to be very expensive, especially if you dont do the work yourself. And nearly always find a restoration will involve a lot more work (and money) than you originally thought!
There are good original cars that do appear reasonably often, the best way to find one is to have the cash on standby and then keep an on the usual suspects, Ebay, Car & Classic, Classic Car weekly etc. If you can, try for a private seller, you'll usually get a more realistic asking price and you may be able to haggle. Some cars with an asking price of around £9-10k are very rarely worth that amount, thats why they are for sale so long.
Good luck with your quest!
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#4 Post by johnnydog » Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:19 pm

I agree with Dave on this. With a restored car, you never quite know the quality of work that has been done; they may be nice and shiny on top, but still rotten underneath. I have seen so many so called restorations which a couple of years down the line have started showing corrosion where it hadn't been properly repaired.
I would, without question, go for a genuine unrestored and original car. Mechanicals are far cheaper to repair than bodywork. A bit of tall order, and you will have a wait on your hands, but when the right car comes along, you will pay a reasonable price for it, but nowhere near what you would pay to restore a car, or what people ask for a so called 'restored' car when the owner tries to recoup some of the cost following major bodywork.
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#5 Post by tony » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:07 am

Don't really know.....20 years ago I bought my '76 TC as a wreck basically . Seized motor etc. Would you believe I was going to take the stainless exhaust off and scrap the rest.
Fortunately I changed my mind as the body was tidy with little rust although she needed a paint and the interior was tidy having only 2 previous owners
Around that time, 1998, there were plenty of cheap Triumphs for sale around here. I bought another car with a recon motor. Got all the bills etc , owner did not want to pay for new tyres. got 2 good doors off her and the motor has never had the head off in my ownership. Got a couple of others with o/d gearbox's . Think over the years I have dismantled 8 fairly rusted and abused cars bought for next to nothing. Haven't really kept track of costs over the years but even after a repaint I don't think it's too much. Apart from the painting I've done all my own repairs.
The only thing to do now is fix the overdrive. I 've got the book and just need to get a new knee so I can get underneath her with a bit of comfort.
I've always believed that having a good body (the car's not mine !) to start with makes the exercise worthwhile.
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#6 Post by JonnyB » Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:09 am

These replies have been really helpful
I guess it is easy to be tempted by what appears to be a low mileage mint car from a dealer but as you all seem to say getting a car with a good body is better long term and price might leave more riggle room for potential problems
Finding a decent solid car brings to mind the words 'teeth' and 'hens' however
I would hope that maybe a member might be persuaded to part with a car as they get in their latter years. Problem is he dreaded 60 is creeping this year so I might run out of time myself!
I had a 2.5S back in the late 90's and bitterly regret selling it and having tried unsuccessfully to find it once more ( I fear it is no longe with us) I have once more got the bug.It was honeysuckle with a brown vinyl roof which I understand was rare. UJD 202S last known to be in the Ipswich area in 2006/7.
I would welcome the nod from anyone in the club who is thinking st some point of parting with their pride and joy bearing in mind it would go to a very attentive new owner
Thanks again fellas

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Re: Buying versus restoring

#7 Post by johnnydog » Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:09 pm

Your old car has not been on the road since 2006, and at its last MOT in 2005, had corrosion around the seatbelt anchorage points, subframe mountings and spring platforms (I presume the upper spring mounting plates). It was supposedly repaired and retested 2 days later, but unless it was done properly, it is likely to have suffered further corrosion issues and may have since been scrapped.
JonnyB wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:09 am
These replies have been really helpful
It was honeysuckle with a brown vinyl roof which I understand was rare.
I think it is only rare because (and this only MY opinion!) Honeysuckle was one of the worst colours and not many people bought them.......sorry! :lol:
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#8 Post by JonnyB » Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:27 pm

Yeah thanks for doing the leg work at the DVLA but was aware of the MOT issues that last time I posted a year or 2 ago and I agree it didn't look good
Still think I'm over trying to find it particularly as the DVLA are reluctant to pass on details of last known owner because of confidentiality issues.
Know what you mean about the colour but it's a very subjective thing. Personally BRG and Brown do nothing for me .White or Tahiti blue being my personal favourites.Dont get me started on red !

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Re: Buying versus restoring

#9 Post by Dave B » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:57 pm

JonnyB wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:27 pm
White or Tahiti blue being my personal favourites.Dont get me started on red !
Whats up wi' red :?: Fastest colour after white. :lol:
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Re: Buying versus restoring

#10 Post by Charles H » Mon Feb 05, 2018 10:53 pm

Rally car is red!!
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