Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

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weeksy
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Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#1 Post by weeksy » Sat Feb 23, 2019 9:57 am

Hi – I’d really appreciate some advice on this forum as I’ve just inherited a beautiful (at least on the surface!) Triumph 2.5PI.

On the plus side, it was bought new by my (mechanically-minded) grandfather and has been in the family since 1970; it’s only done 45,000 miles; and the interior is immaculate. On the other hand, it has been sitting in a garage for around a decade unused; it currently has no battery; and there are some patches of rust on the wheel arches – but, more worryingly, on the sills. I’ve had a good poke, but space in the garage is limited at the moment so it’s unclear how bad this damage is until I get it out.

So my questions are:
• Are there any decent Triumph garages near either Gatwick, Sussex, or Lewisham, London, that anyone could recommend?
• If the sills are badly rotten, is it possible to get these fixed – and any idea of cost?
• I would be keeping it on a driveway, but not in a garage. I’ve heard rumours that the bodywork may suffer if it’s not in a garage – is this true? If so, would a car cover help?

Many thanks for your help – and respect to everyone who’s keeping these vehicles running!

Chris

Tinsmith_Skippy
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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#2 Post by Tinsmith_Skippy » Sat Feb 23, 2019 1:01 pm

Hello Chris welcome to the forum. Good to hear another big six has been awakened from a slumber in a garage

I can easily answer 1 one of your questions always protect these cars with a cover.

Main reason when it rains the water runs straight off the roof into the lower wing area depending on how long the car has been exposed this will eventually seap into the sills eventually and rot them from the inside out.

To answer your other questions the panels are being reproduced by Lloyd Reed who has a website southwalestriumphs.com this will give you an idea of the cost depending how servere the sills are

The sills are made up of three panels inner, centre and outer.

Then it’s labour which I haven’t asked anyone for ages what the going rate is.

It is possible to remove and graft sections in neatly, but finding someone who loves your car as much as you do will be difficult as this option is labour intensive and labour is costly.

Then there is the mot pass way which is normally the cheapest because it’s the quickest this uses joggle, plate over and filler techniques. This will give you a car on the road and enjoyment, long as the mot man is happy with these repairs he will give a ticket to ride.

I’m sure someone on here could recommend a welder or restoration firm local to you. If you do take your car to someone and your unsure you can always ask any of your doubts on here.

All the best with your project and look forward to seeing the progress. Pictures we all love to see pictures!
Ross Taylor & Paul Taylor
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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#3 Post by badger » Sat Feb 23, 2019 6:43 pm

For any welding/ restoration work, use Derek Wandsworth. He s in Guildford, very reasonable rates, and his work is excellent, he won’t rip you off, and is a fellow 2500 owner. Autopride Classic Cars. Find him on Facebook, or google.

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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#4 Post by Mike Stevens » Sat Feb 23, 2019 10:21 pm

Hi Chris,

Good for you to rescue a big saloon! To my mind, you have perhaps the best model there - but that is only my opinion and others will definitely not agree!

Tinsmith_Skippy has just about said it all - except that since last year, these cars no longer require an MOT. Yes, daft isn't it? I shall still be submitting all my 'classics' for a test just to get an independent view on my work.

I have a Mk2 PI which is going to be restored when I finish my early Land Rover and I can get in the workshop end of the garage.

I wish you well with the car. The smile I get when driving a well-sorted PI is always worth all the work!

A plug here - you may think that it is worth joining the Register. It is where the knowledge now lies and where the specialists advertise. You will also get your name in orange on here... :D

Good luck!

Cheers,
Mike.
(South Oxfordshire)
Register Member No 0355
1971 2.5PI Saloon Sapphire blue
1973 2.5PI Saloon rust some Honeysuckle
1973 Stag French blue
(1949 LandRover was blue should be light green!)

johnnydog
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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#5 Post by johnnydog » Wed Feb 27, 2019 1:38 am

I agree - the PI was once the least attractive model due to a lack of understanding of fuel injection issues which caused excessive fuel consumption and reliability issues, which in turn resulted in owners prematurely disposing of their cars, or converting them to carbs. These issues have now been largely overcome, and a property tuned PI is a joy to drive as well as being one off the more desirable models today.
Being stored in a garage for ten years will not have done it any favours; especially if it was a concrete garage or there was not a free flow of air through it to dry out any condensation. However, visible surface rust on the wheelarches and sills is not the main concern unless it is holed - surface rust can be dealt with. If the metal has corroded to an extent that that it is holed or literally corroded away, then more drastic work is needed, but unseen rust needs to be thoroughly checked for, especially in the sills.
As Ross says, the sills are in 3 sections, and if there is rust in the outer skin, there is likely to be rust internally too, which becomes costly to repair if done properly. There is a tendency to just repair the visible areas, with cover sills or a few plates welded here and there and then filled, but this is really like a woman using a lot of makeup to try to improve their visible appearance, but is like plastering over the cracks and it doesn't do anything to improve their looks underneath :lol: :lol:...... The wheelarches are the same, to a lesser degree; if there is rust on the outer wheel arch edge, there is likely to be rust in the inner wheel arch bowl too. This repair is easier than the sills, but still needs a proper repair.
There are drain holes in the bottom of the front wings, about 4" in front of the sills on the lower curve, which can get blocked resulting in water that runs down the roof guttering into the inner wing just sitting in there doing its worst. When repairs are done, these drain holes often get overlooked, and without them rain water has no escape. These drain holes are not obvious, so they do get forgotten about during sill repairs.
Having given the doom and gloom side of things, a well sorted PI is definitely a great car to drive, so don't let any of this put you off.
If going for a car cover, you should get one that is breathable, to prevent condensation, and one that has a soft lining so that any movement from the wind or elements will not abrade the paintwork.
A wealth of knowledge on here will no doubt assist you through your venture! Good luck with It!
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1967 Mk1 2000 in Gunmetal Grey
1969 Mk1 2000 in Royal Blue
1970 Mk2 2000 in Valencia Blue
1972 Mk2 2.5 PI in Triumph White
1973 Mk2 2.5 PI in Sienna Brown
1976 Mk2 2500S in Carmine Red

weeksy
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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#6 Post by weeksy » Fri Mar 01, 2019 1:14 pm

Thanks very much for the detailed advice. Don't want to bite off more than it's possible to chew, but this just about doable. Cheers

weeksy
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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#7 Post by weeksy » Sat Mar 09, 2019 8:55 am

A follow-up question - in terms of getting the Triumph towed, do you reckon it's straightforward and a regular garage with a flatbed lorry could handle it? Particularly as the wheels may be seized.

Or would it be preferable to get a specialist company which may handle the car more 'delicately'?

This is near Gatwick, transferring the car into southeast London.

Thanks again

johnnydog
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Re: Inherited Triumph - advice appreciated!

#8 Post by johnnydog » Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:36 pm

Having recovered many scrap Triumphs over the years, the main problem will be accessibility. If it is accessible for the recovery vehicle to reverse more for less right up to it, then it shouldn't be a major problem. Assuming the recovery vehicle has a winch, then a bit of brute force may be necessary. Try to get as much air in the tyres as you can (at least so they look inflated and round!) as they will roll better. Seized brakes will be the worse aspect to deal with. I would remove each rear wheel, and then with a lump hammer hit the rear drum at the same time as using a crow bar with a hooked end between the wheel studs to try to get them to turn slightly. Once they will move, even slightly, that should be enough to recover it and makes the recovery kinder on the car - dragging seized wheels makes life hard work. A key to release the steering lock makes life easier as well!
If it is to be recovered backwards and has a tow bar, then that makes life easy - if no tow bar, then a webbing towing strap carefully wrapped around the rear bumper by one of the mounting bolts will do. Same if is is to be recovered forwards - a strap through the front bumper irons will do. Don't use a chain or rope for this - a strap lies flat over the bumper and is kinder on them. If you attempt to put a strap round the engine cross member, there is a likelihood that the strap may cause damage to the front valence and number plate. If a chain is used , then as long as it is fastened to each bottom suspension arm, with a centralizing strap, it should clear the valence with care. However the angle going up the ramps will cause the winch or chain to be nearer towards the bodywork.
A flatbed should be sufficient to recover it. I would however watch them like a hawk, as my experience of recovery companies (in my past life!) is that the majority aren't too sympathetic about the vehicle unless it is of a higher value.
I would also ensure the lashing straps round the wheels are clear of the wheelarches when secured, as the suspension movement will cause the straps to rub on any part of the body it comes into contact with as rear track on our Triumphs is narrower than more modern vehicles.
If the recovery person is worth their salt, then they should be able to recover it properly. The local scrap chap with a recovery truck though wouldn't be my first choice!!
Register Member no. 1596

1967 Mk1 2000 in Gunmetal Grey
1969 Mk1 2000 in Royal Blue
1970 Mk2 2000 in Valencia Blue
1972 Mk2 2.5 PI in Triumph White
1973 Mk2 2.5 PI in Sienna Brown
1976 Mk2 2500S in Carmine Red

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