Log on request.

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Allen Walker
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Re: Log on request.

#11 Post by Allen Walker » Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:35 pm

I don't think it means anything David. I think I'm correct in saying that the majority of home users wouldn't have a static IP address anyway so it could be a number of people using the same host/ISP.
Very few of those IP addresses would identify a particular individual.
Allen Walker
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Used to have a 1976 Triumph 2500S Saloon in BRG :-(

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David Withers
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Re: Log on request.

#12 Post by David Withers » Fri Oct 10, 2008 6:45 pm

Thanks for that, Allen. It all falls into place now - and I can sleep tonight after all. :wink:

By the way, I have a habit of reading a posting or thread and then clicking on this forum in my Favourites to get to the front page again, rather than clicking Back step-by-step. I assume each time I do this it is showing as separate visits.

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Re: Log on request.

#13 Post by Mike Stevens » Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:44 pm

Dizzy wrote:Hmm. My IP address is in the list - and fairly well up it too (I'm 'active retired' but always take a few breaks during the day to see what's going on here!).

What surprises me is, if I understood you correctly Mike, you use something called NAT that avoids your IP address being seen by others. I use a wireless router with a firewall set to 'on' and in security tests conducted via anti-virus websites the report has been that my computer cannot be identified, let alone accessed. At least I thought that was what they were saying.
Hi David,

NAT - Network Address Translation. The IP addresses occupy 32 bits and so, in theory, there are 4,300,000,000 different ones. Actually, not that many as certain blocks are not used. This is not enough for everybody and everything in the world and to simplify things, inside your house where the router isolates you from the Big Bad Internet, you will use a different IP address, probably something like 192.168.something.something. Just about everybody uses these same addresses inboard of the router. The router then translates these to the 'real' IP address that was allocated by your service provider when it last connected. Thus the IP addresses used by your PC, and a heck of a lot of others, can actually be the same, with the router translating these on the way out and in again. If you have more than 1 PC connected to the router, then it will use another address in the same range. These addresses are allocated by the router when your PC starts up. Clever stuff.

Now, this is only my understanding of how it works, and I suspect there are much more knowledgeable people out there who will correct me.

Now, back to Triumph things. I am going to complete the wiring for the new relay controlled headlights tomorrow. The weather looks good so hopefully I won't get a wet back while leaning over the engine compartment. My measurements show that the volt drop in the standard loom results in a 30% loss of 'power' to the headlamps!

There you are, something Triumph related!

Cheers,
Mike.
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Alec
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Re: Log on request.

#14 Post by Alec » Sat Oct 11, 2008 6:44 am

Hello Mike,

30% sounds a tremendous amount. Are you saying a volt drop of 30%, i.e 3.6 at a nominal 12 volts.?

What is harder to determine is the amount of light output that is lost as incandescent lamps are very sensitive to voltage as their brightness is greater the higher the voltage applied. Certainly in a 30 year old or more car there is likely to be a deterioration in the connections etc which usually will not affect the control side of a relay so it is a good idea to fit them, with the proviso that adequately sized cable is used on the power side.

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David Withers
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Re: Log on request.

#15 Post by David Withers » Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:34 am

Wow! Two people - Allen and Mike - explaining computer-related workings to me in a language that I can understand! :D

Regarding using relays in headlamp systems, this does introduce an item that could fail (though unlikely) and let the lights suddenly go out. It just occurred to me that the feed from the switch to the relay could be taken also to the headlamps so that if the relay failed the headlamps would stay on, albeit perhaps a little dimmer. Or is it me that's getting a little dimmer?

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Re: Log on request.

#16 Post by Alec » Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:58 am

Hello David,

yes, it would work, although rather unconventional?

The weak link seems to be the light switch, so that would not reduce the load on the switch as much as using it to only power the relay. (The current would be shared between the relay supply and the switch supply in a ratio of their resistances.)


I have three relays for my headlights, one for dip and two for the main beams so there is some room for failure there, albeit the need to quickly flick to main if the dip relay fails.

Alec
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Allen Walker
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Re: Log on request.

#17 Post by Allen Walker » Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:30 am

Dizzy wrote:By the way, I have a habit of reading a posting or thread and then clicking on this forum in my Favourites to get to the front page again, rather than clicking Back step-by-step. I assume each time I do this it is showing as separate visits.
Don't know, but if it does, great!
Anyway, why not try using the 'breadcrumb trail' which is at the top and bottom of every page. Just click on 'Board Index' to go right back to the front page.
Allen Walker
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David Withers
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Re: Log on request.

#18 Post by David Withers » Sat Oct 11, 2008 10:58 am

Allen, I hadn't noticed the 'Board Index' until you mentioned it. Thank you!

And thanks to Alec for explaining that my unconventional wiring idea isn't as useful as I hoped it might be... hence not worthwhile for Allen to transfer the discussion to its proper place, i.e. "Electrical"!

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Re: Log on request.

#19 Post by Mike Stevens » Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:21 pm

Alec wrote:30% sounds a tremendous amount. Are you saying a volt drop of 30%, i.e 3.6 at a nominal 12 volts.?

What is harder to determine is the amount of light output that is lost as incandescent lamps are very sensitive to voltage as their brightness is greater the higher the voltage applied. Certainly in a 30 year old or more car there is likely to be a deterioration in the connections etc which usually will not affect the control side of a relay so it is a good idea to fit them, with the proviso that adequately sized cable is used on the power side.
Hi Alec,

No, I measured a voltage drop of 2.1V on main beam, 1.1 on dip, (battery to bulb connector). With a constant load resistance, power in the load is a function of voltage squared. So I reckoned on (9.9/12) squared. Ok, I know that the bulb won't be a constant resistance, but I don't think it will be far off just changing from 10 to 12V. I have already converted to Halogens, but I believe the current is much the same as the original sealed beam units. As you say, how this relates to change in actual light output is anybody's guess, but it must be a good thing to put the power into the bulb and not the wiring loom!

Interesting that you have used 2 relays for the main beam. I'm using some 6RA types, and the main beam one has very occasionally stuck on, (it releases with a tap, but that's hardly convenient!). I'm wondering if I am overrating the relays, so some more modifications might be in order. Luckily I made the relay plate to take THREE of them - just in case.

I'll try to take a picture of the assembly for those who may be interested.

Cheers,
Mike.
Last edited by Mike Stevens on Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:39 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Log on request.

#20 Post by kevinw » Mon Oct 13, 2008 7:02 am

Another vehicle that I once owned (1950 Bedford OB coach) had 4 relays on the headlights - one each for main and dipped on each side. Each was rated at 30A. The wiring on this had been considerably changed as it originally had the old style of dipping where the offside lamp is extinguished entirely. Even with polished reflectors and replacement halogen bulbs, the light output was so pathetic that you could quite happily drive on main beam all the time and not dazzle any oncoming traffic. Presented for MOT once, oe of the headlight bowls had been knocked and the lights were wildly out of alignment. The tester let it go (most suprising as it was a Government Vehicle Testing Station) saying that the light output was so pathetically dim that there was no chance of dazzling anyone.

Struggling to get back on topic, I'd confirm that the earlier explanations of address translation are exactly how I understand it to work.

Kevin
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